THE JACKSONVILLE FOUNDATION | Because the best stories are told by those who see things differently. info@thejacksonvillefoundation.org

OUR MISSION

The Jacksonville Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization created to serve families of those on the autism spectrum.  Your generous donations support The Carmel Spectrum Players, a theater group for individuals on the autism spectrum. We believe that every person deserves a platform on which to showcase their talents.

Sometimes real superheroes live in the hearts of small children fighting big battles. ~Anonymous

Thank you for partnering with us!

OUR MISSION

The Jacksonville Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization created to serve families of those on the autism spectrum.  Your generous donations support two programs: Early Childhood education through Early Learning Indiana, and The Carmel Spectrum Players, a theater group for individuals on the autism spectrum

Sometimes real superheroes live in the hearts of small children fighting big battles. ~Anonymous

Thank you for partnering with us!

Why Jacksonville?

 

Our son, Jack, is on the autsim spectrum. He has a beautiful imagination. When he was little and became enchanted with the story in his head, he would gallop around the house humming with a terrific smile on his face. My husband and I would joke and say things like: “They must have inflated the bounce houses in Jacksonville” or “The ice cream truck must be in Jacksonville.” I never thought Jack noticed until one day when I asked, “Jack, what are you pretending? I want to go there. It sounds delightful!” He looked at me and said, “I’ve gone to Jacksonville, and you’re not invited.” When deciding on what to call this book, the answer was quite clear.

One in

Children are on the autism spectrum

Only

%

of autistic adults are employed full time

it costs

extra dollars per year to educate a student with autism

“What would happen if the autism gene was eliminated from the gene pool? You would have a bunch of people standing around in a cave, chatting and socializing and not getting anything done.”

 

Dr. Temple Grandin

Carmel Spectrum Players

Carmel Spectrum players was formed to give every person on the autism spectrum a chance to shine. Expression through The Arts uses the creative process of art-making to improve and enhance the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of individuals of all ages. We believe that the creative process involved in artistic self-expression helps people to resolve conflicts and problems, develop interpersonal skills, manage behavior, reduce stress, increase self-esteem, and self-awareness.

Everyone deserves at least one ovation in their life.

Early Learning Indiana

Early Learning Indiana provides leadership, advocacy, and early childhood education services to continually improve the early learning landscape in Indiana. We adhere to four guiding initiatives:

  • We operate high-quality child care centers.
  • We help families find quality child care.
  • We partner with teachers and providers to improve program quality.
  • We advocate for greater access to early educational opportunities for all Hoosier families.
The mission of Early Learning Indiana is to ensure the highest level of early care and education for children in Indiana.

 

Carmel Spectrum Players

Carmel Spectrum players was formed to give every person on the autism spectrum a chance to shine. Expression through The Arts uses the creative process of art-making to improve and enhance the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of individuals of all ages. We believe that the creative process involved in artistic self-expression helps people to resolve conflicts and problems, develop interpersonal skills, manage behavior, reduce stress, increase self-esteem, and self-awareness.

Everyone deserves at least one standing ovation in their life.

 

Asperger’s Syndrome is Not a Separate Condition

In the May 2013 publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual – 5, generally accepted as the authoritative description of mental health conditions, Asperger’s Syndrome no longer exists as a separate disorder. Its place has now been taken by Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

This means that officially there is no such thing as Asperger’s. The behaviors that were associated with Asperger’s Syndrome are now understood to be caused autism. The word “Asperger’s” is often replaced with the phrase “High Functioning Autism”, since the behaviors are not severe or comprehensive, but it is still the case that the condition is part of autism.

Asperger’s Syndrome is a Developmental Disorder

A developmental disorder is a chronic, severe disability of a person at least 5 years of age that results in substantial limitations in three or more of the following:

  • Self-care
  • Language
  • Learning
  • Mobility
  • Capacity for independent living
  • Economic self-sufficiency

In most instances, Asperger’s Syndrome is present at birth and continues throughout the person’s life-span. It can impact the person’s learning, language, capacity for independent living and self-care skills, although these skills are not always affected.

It is mainly considered a develomental disporder because it is a life-long condition and because it has such an important impact on the person’s life.

Intelligence Plays No Role in Asperger’s

Unlike classic autism, which often negatively affects the person’s intelligence, people with Asperger’s often have normal or above-normal intelligence.

An unusual preoccupation with very specific subject matter is characteristic of those with Asperger’s, e.g., extensive knowledge of train schedules, WWII fighter aircraft, or pre-historic dinosaurs. They tend to have a restricted range of things that interest them. Because of their interests and focus, they can succeed in tasks that require a great deal of intelligence.

No One Knows What Causes It

The cause(s) of Asperger’s (I will still use that term throughout this article) is still largely a mystery. Research shows that it is connected to early changes in the structure of the brain as it is developing in the fetus and very early in the child’s life.

What causes these changes is not fully understood. One thing that is clear, however, is that heredity places a role in Asperger’s. Studies of identical twins show that when one child has Asperger’s the chances of the other child also having Asperger’s is about 30%. Such a strong association indicates that genes and inheritance are significant causes of Asperger’s.

Asperger’s Involves Social Difficulties

People with Asperger’s have trouble understanding what someone else is thinking and feeling. They often need to be taught social behavior that is learned and understood normally by others. They have difficulty understanding non-verbal, unspoken communication such as hand movements, facial expressions and tone of voice.

They often describe themselves as feeling different from most other people. They tend to see the world in black and white, with difficulty compromising or seeing the grey areas. Eye contact is difficult for them. All this adds to their social awkwardness and trouble relating to others.

There is No Connection Between Asperger’s and Violence

There is no evidence that people with Asperger’s are any more prone to violent behavior than the general population. They are sometimes diagnosed with other mental health conditions like depression, anxiety, bi-polar disorder, and obsessive compulsive disorder. Whatever aggressive, violent behavior they might demonstrate is more likely due to these other conditions than to Asperger’s itself.

UCLA Professor Elizabeth Laugeson states that there is no clear association between Asperger’s and violent behavior. She notes that while there may be a higher rate of aggressive behavior in people with Asperger’s, as there is with autism, planning and intended violent behavior is not characteristic of Asperger’s.

*Source: http://www.kennethrobersonphd.com/aspergers-syndrome/ 

Ted Talks

Rosie King

How Autism Freed Me To Be Myself

Ami Klin

A New Way To Diagnose Autism

Temple Grandin

The World Needs All Kinds Of Minds

Wendy Chung

What We Don’t Know About Autism

Rosie King

How Autism Freed Me To Be Myself

Ami Klin

A New Way To Diagnose Autism

Temple Grandin

The World Needs All Kinds Of Minds

Wendy Chung

What We Don’t Know About Autism

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Brandt & Vicki Burdick

Drew & Lauren Hammond

Mary Virginia Hammond

John Hammond

Tim & Missy Meador

Jake Mickel

Robert Campbell

Ed & Mari Sandifer

Alex & Hollyn Swider

David & Courtney Williams

 

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